The Ultimate Guide To Creating People Analytics Content That Resonates [2017 Edition]

Heather R. Huhman

The Ultimate Guide To Creating People Analytics Content That Resonates [2017 Edition]

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The Ultimate Guide To Creating People Analytics Content That Resonates [2017 Edition]

Numbers tell a story. The data provided by people analytics create a tale of what’s going on in a workplace. They tell us how employees are feeling and what they are doing. Unfortunately, not everyone sees that story.

But you do.

As a content marketer who writes people analytics content, it’s your job to transform data into a story that people love to hear. You can show them how the numbers give their company a happy ending.

First, however, you need to reach that audience.

That’s why the Come Recommended team decided to dive into the data (courtesy of BuzzSumo) to determine exactly how to produce people analytics content that will resonate with your current and potential customers.

We analyzed a total of 889 articles, which combined received approximately 91,120 shares. This means people analytics content, on average, garnered 102 shares per piece.

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However, yours could perform even better. The following guide is full of takeaways to optimize your content in 2017.

Best Month

At first glance, it might seem like July is the best month for people analytics content. While it’s true that the topic earned significantly more shares that month, it was mostly due to two specific pieces of content. In July of last year, McKinsey & Company released a piece that quickly went viral in the HR community. It alone earned 8,900 shares. Within 48 hours, a rebuttal piece was published on LinkedIn and quickly received almost 2,000 shares itself.

Those two pieces make it seem like July is the month to focus on people analytics content. The consistency of the topic throughout the rest of the year, however, implies the topic can do well at any time.

Marketing takeaway: Pay attention to people analytics content that goes viral, then find ways to piggy-back on its popularity. Offer alternative views or focus on one of its more controversial points. This will help you get exposure when the next big wave of popularity comes around.

Best Day of the Week

Across all platforms, Monday is the best day for people analytics, especially on Twitter and LinkedIn. There’s more consistency on Facebook, with Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday getting similar share totals. Definitely avoid the weekends, however, because those days get significantly lower averages.

Marketing takeaway: Consider publishing your people analytics content on Monday and sharing it the same day on all three platforms. Then, you can repost the content later in the week on Friday to catch the eye of anyone who might have missed the original shares.

Best Content Type

Lists on LinkedIn are the most popular type of content. They receive an average of 188 shares on the platform. Why posts perform the best on Twitter; that type of content receives almost twice as many shares on the social network than the next most popular type. On Facebook, how-tos do well, but there’s not much of a difference between those and lists or why posts.

Marketing takeaway: While multimedia, like infographics and video, isn’t the most popular type of people analytics content, that doesn’t mean your content should be devoid of images. Include charts and graphs so the reader can fully understand exactly what they should be looking for with regard to talent management and data.

Best Length

Longer people analytics content does much better; pieces over 3,000 words racked up an average of 466 shares. In comparison, posts under 1,000 words only earned an average of 58 shares.

Marketing takeaway: People analytics is still a relatively new topic in the HR community. Understandably, there’s a lot of information for you to put out and for audiences to consume. Don’t underestimate your reader’s interest in the topic. Provide them with thorough content that will answer all their questions as they learn about this new trend.

Best Network

While people analytics content does have a presence on Facebook and Twitter, neither can hold a candle to the popularity on LinkedIn. The topic earned a total of 67,678 shares on that platform alone. While it’s far behind, it’s worth noting that Twitter had the next highest total with 13,147 shares.

Marketing takeaway: Focus the majority of your efforts on LinkedIn. But that doesn’t mean you can completely ignore Twitter. The topic is popular on the platform, and your tweets will face less competition than on LinkedIn.

Best Keywords

LinkedIn

“Things HR”? Before you go and change you’re entire people analytics strategy to revolve around that strange phrase, remember this: the title of the aforementioned — and highly popular — McKinsey piece was “People Analytics Reveals Three Things HR May Be Getting Wrong.” Once again, that blog caused a spike in the data.

Looking past the keywords related to that piece, you’ll see a more telling trend. The keywords “great workplace” and “case” imply that the most popular type of people analytics content gives real-world examples. Your reader wants case studies that give them details about how companies are using data to improve their workplace.

Marketing takeaway: Case studies are your best friend. Share and promote success stories of your clients or other companies using people analytics. 

Facebook

Again, ignoring the keywords related to the McKinsey piece, what stands out on Facebook is “great workplace.” Other phrases that do well on the platform are “retention” and “employee engagement.” So, people analytics content that touches on those topics will also be popular.

Marketing takeaway: Don’t be afraid to get more specific with your content on Facebook. Anything that shows how people analytics can be applied to individual HR topics will be appreciated.

Twitter

Once again, “great workplace” is the best phrase on this social media platform. Keep rolling out content featuring what companies are doing right with people analytics.

Marketing takeaway: Feel free to recycle your content on all three platforms. When a topic is as popular as “great workplace” is, get the most mileage you can. Also, don’t forget to tag companies you spotlight in your pieces. This will get them invested in the content and increase the chances of them sharing it with their following, as well.

Conclusion

Overall

Timing

Spread your people analytics content out throughout the year. But pay attention to pieces that go viral. When something goes big, take advantage of the surge in popularity by releasing or resharing your own relevant content.

Type

Fill your content calendar mostly with list pieces. Round it out with the occasional why piece and promote it heavily on Twitter, since that’s where that type of content does best.

Length

Go big or go home with people analytics content. Try to get all of your content to at least 3,000 words. And whatever you do, never produce a piece under 1,000 words.

Social Network

Focus most of your energy on LinkedIn. However, if you notice your content is getting buried under all the other people analytics content on the platform, move your effort over to Twitter. The topic is popular there as well, but there’s less competition.

Keywords

Keywords that are similar to “great workplace” will have the biggest impact. This signals to your audience there are real examples in the piece, which will make it more credible.

Caution

Like all best practices, it’s important to experiment and analyze what works best for your specific customer.

When Devoting One Month to People Analytics Content

Timing

Whichever month you choose for your people analytics content, promote it on Monday and Friday. Those are the days that will get you the most shares.

Type

Pack your month with a mix of lists, how-tos, and why posts. This will keep your audience from getting bored of the same type of posts each and every day.

Length

Over 3,000 words. Remember that even content like infographics or videos can be accompanied by longer copy that helps you reach that word count.

Social Network

Stick mostly to LinkedIn. Having a mixed strategy of share and publishing people analytics content on the platform will have the biggest impact.

Keywords

Focus on phrases that emphasize how people analytics can turn a company into a “great workplace.” Also, use keywords that involve other relevant HR topics like employee engagement or retention.

When Devoting Once or More a Week to People Analytics

Timing

Across all platforms, the best day for people analytics content is Monday. If you only have time for one day each week, that’s your day.

Type

Avoid any type of content that lends itself to a smaller word count. In-depth lists posts are always a good option.

Length

Try your best to reach 3,000 words, but never at the expense of the quality of the content. If you’re just adding words to hit that number, it’s not worth much to your audience.

Social Network

LinkedIn is the perfect platform for once-a-week people analytics content. You can balance that out with other posts and still have an appealing newsfeed. Twitter needs more frequent posting than that, so if you only have one day, stay away from that social network.

Keywords

When in doubt, use “great workplace.” As long as it’s relevant, of course.

All You Need to Know About Attracting HR Professionals With Awesome Content

Do you want even more data about reaching HR pros with content? Together with Recruiter.com, we conducted our own research to discover what content they read, when they read it, where they look for content, how they share it, and more.

Heather R. Huhman

Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for organizations with products that target job seekers and/or employers. She is also the author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships: The Truth About Getting from Classroom to Cubicle (2011), #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.